The National Science Foundation’s Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program funded a project at UConn to create very small microfluidic devices that mimic the guts of termites to allow investigators to study how the microbes that live there communicate with one another. The project team also studies how microbes and the termite’s cells communicate with one another in living termites.

termitesTermite microbes








Reticulitermes flavipes termite                     Termite gut protists 

colony in the lab                                            in a microfluidic device


DSCN1109 copy

  Build a termite farm

DSCN2066 copy

                                   Hunt for termites

14-3-2011 - 10.50.46

Learn about microbes

inside termite guts



workersoldier



worker >



< reproductive

reproductive

                                                       soldier


Other project senior personnel:

Project consultant                                                     Outreach coordinator

Jared Leadbetter                                    Kenneth Noll

Professor of Environmental Microbiology                 Professor

California Institute of Technology                             UConn MCB

LeadbetterNoll